And I thought I could blog during a pandemic...

When the pandemic first hit and everything moved to remote teaching, I remember thinking that I would have a lot to blog about. Suddenly it seemed as though everybody had developed a deep and abiding interest in pedagogy, and that there would be so much content to think about and write on. There was, of course. Everybody and their brother had something to say about the transition, and we were bombarded with guides and how-tos from various faculty centres. Indeed, I was part of that (and very proud of that work, I might add)!


But thinking that I would be able to blog was ludicrous. I guess I completely forgot about the fact that I'd be balancing remote teaching for the first time, whatever professional responsibilities I wasn't letting slide completely, and homeschooling my own kids. HAH.


I now feel like I've finally started to get back into the swing of things. Part of it is, I'm sure, the fact that the political climate doesn't drag on me in quite the same way as it did before. That added a kind of a mental drain that was hard enough to overcome for getting my actual work done, never mind something extra. My workload is also somewhat lighter this semester, as a lot of the pedagogical initiatives I was working to implement into Nature of Language are done now, and only need tweaking here and there. Finally, I feel like I've just gotten better at working at home, which I found very difficult at first: I had spent so long cultivating have a separation of work-life and home-life (to the extent that academia allows that), that I found it very jarring to have that obliterated.


So I'm going to aim for a semi-regular schedule, as much for myself as anything. Over this past year I've been thinking a lot about teaching, and I think I'll be helped by getting my not-quite-fully-thought-out ideas down. Wish me luck!

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